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East Asian Studies

This is the Plone Site for East Asian Studies. Estimated time to switch the site over June 1, 2008.

East Asian Studies

  Wingchi Ip with student

 

East Asian Studies is a strong and vibrant program at UC Davis. Our faculty research and teach across the disciplines from the Humanities and Social Sciences to the various other sciences. Disciplines include Anthropology, Art History, Agriculture and Plant Sciences, Geology, History, Sociology, Psychology, Political Science, Literature, Nutrition and more. The EAS program actively sponsors and promotes lectures by visiting and campus experts, colloquia, symposia, and workshops addressing the concerns of the research community. These events are free and open to the public as we recognize that they can enrich the lives and affect the choices made by people in our larger region. Understanding East Asia today requires knowledge and appreciation of the forces that have shaped its diverse cultures and societies. It offers us a perspective on the diversity of human achievements and is key to understanding the region.

 

 

THE EAS MAJOR

Study of East Asia at UC Davis draws faculty from many disciplines.  The Program prepares students for varied career possibilities, training them in a core set of courses at the lower-division level, and in a wide range of more advanced and specialize courses in the humanities, social sciences, and the sciences.  This enables the student and adviser to tailor an individualized program of study.

After taking the core courses, in conjunction with at least two years of either Chinese or Japanese language study, the student chooses five or more additional courses focusing on a special field of interest. A student considering a business career might select a course in the Political Science Department on American-Japanese relations and study international trade and finance in the Economics Department, together with a seminar or independent study on the Japanese economy. On the other hand, a major interested in journalism or government service may concentrate on the modern history and politics of both China and Japan, taking courses dealing with modernization and revolution and Marxist theory.

Students majoring in other fields, such as literature, economics, history, international relations, agricultural sciences, may find courses in East Asian Studies relevant to their particular career goals or academic interests. As well, students may choose to double major, combining East Asian Studies with another area of study. The faculty are as eager to introduce appreciation of East Asia to future textile engineers, doctors, and agronomists, as they are to train Asia specialists.

 

 

 
 FOR QUESTIONS, PLEASE CONTACT:

Undergraduate advising center: (530) 752-9241, easugadvisor@ucdavis.edu, 2216 Social Science & Humanities Building  

Program coordinator:  Patrick Kinkade, (530) 752-3046, pkkinkade@ucdavis.edu, 1277 Social Science & Humanities Building

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Advising

Got Questions? We're here to help!


UNDERGRADUATE ADVISING CENTER

Want to check your major progress or declare an East Asian Studies major or minor? Schedule an advising appointment with the Undergraduate Advisor. Advising appointments are available Monday-Friday 8:30-11:00am and 1:00-4:00pm. To schedule an appointment please email or call (530) 752-9241.

 


PATRICK KINKADE
Program Coordinator

1277 Social Sciences and Humanities Building
Office Hours:  8-Noon, 1-4 pm M-Th
E-mail: pkkinkade@ucdavis.edu

(530) 752-3046

 

STEPHEN FAGERNESS
Peer Advisor
1275 Social Sciences and Humanities Building
E-mail: fagerness@ucdavis.edu

 

KATHARINE BURNETT
Program Director
160 Everson
E-mail: kpburnett@ucdavis.edu

 

 

 

 

Frequently asked questions:

 

What do I need to do to major in EAS? Come by 107 Sproul Hall to meet with the Major Advisor. You will be given a form that you need to fill out and have signed. Then, you just need to drop off the form to the L & S Dean's Office. No courses are required to declare the major, although it is recommended to take History 9A and 9B before declaring your major in EAS.

How about a minor? You file your petition to minor when you file your intent to graduate. Minor worksheet forms are available outside of 107 Sproul Hall and on this website to aid you in selecting courses for the minor.

How do I double major? To become a double major in EAS and another discipline, you need to fill out a double major form (available online through the Dean's office or from your EAS advisor). Once you have filled out the form completely, bring it to the EAS advisor to sign. You will also need to get the signature of your second major advisor. Please keep in mind that only one, and sometimes possibly two courses can overlap between majors.

Am I allowed to take a language other than Chinese or Japanese? (like Korean) Many students inquire why they cannot use Korean and other East Asian languages to satisfy the language requirement. Since UCD only offers Chinese and Japanese language courses, we can only accept these two languages and not any others.

When can I study abroad? You can study abroad at almost any time in your academic career. Your best bet is to meet with an advisor at the Education Abroad Center to discuss your plan and then meet with the EAS Advisor to make sure the courses you want to take can transfer.

Do my Education Abroad Program courses count toward the major? Most likely, yes. It depends on how close they are to courses offered here at UC Davis. You should consult with the major advisor to determine which EAP courses would be suitable for your major at UC Davis. Please keep in mind that this is important to take care of before leaving to study abroad.

Do my community college courses satisfy the UCD East Asian Studies major requirements?
Some do and some do not. You cannot assume that since your course has transferred over and has the same name as a UCD course, that it will also count towards the EAS major. The courses you took must be evaluated by the major advisor. See the ASSIST Web page to find UCD courses equivalent to your community college courses.

Can upper-division courses I took at another university be used to satisfy the UCD major requirements? Yes, if the course is substantially similar to a UCD EAS course. See the major advisor for approval.

Do I need to satisfy the Preparatory Subject Matter (lower-division courses) before I can take upper-division courses? Courses may be taken in any order, but be sure to check for prerequisites.

Do courses used to satisfy the GE requirements count toward the major? Yes, many do. Please check the UCD General Catalog.

Can I take courses for the major pass/non-pass?
Yes, up to the limits set by the college of Letters and Science. For example: One-fourth of your total units taken at UC Davis (except for courses such as 199 which are graded on a pass/non-pass basis only) and the limits set for the campus, e.g. one-third of your total units taken at UC Davis. If you are thinking about taking a course on this basis, please see the major advisor about how it will look on your transcript.

What happens if major requirements change while I am a student? You have the right to complete the requirements listed in the General Catalog at the time you entered the University. If, however, you choose to complete the revised requirements instead, you may do so.

Other questions?
Send your questions to: cvans@ucdavis.edu

“The world is like a mirror, you see? Smile, and your friends smile back.” Japanese Zen saying

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Courses

Expanded Course Descriptions

Fall Quarter 2007


New major/minor courses

The major & minor worksheet forms have been updated! Download one now to make sure you are on the right track to graduation. If you have any questions, please see your advisor.

“In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert's mind there are few.” Shunryu Suzuki



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Major

East Asian Studies' students are given much flexibility in their educational path. Because the major is inter-disciplinary, students are able to tailor their educational needs to their interests. After taking the core courses, in conjunction with two years or more of either Chinese or Japanese language study, the student chooses five or more additional courses focusing on their special field of interest.

A student considering a business career, for instance, might select a course in the Political Science Department on American-Japanese relations and study international trade and finance in the Economics Department, together with a seminar or individually guided work on the Japanese economy. On the other hand, a major interested in journalism or government service may concentrate on the modern history and politics of both China and Japan, taking courses dealing with modernization, revolution and Marxist theory, and international relations.

East Asian Studies' majors from UC Davis are well prepared for either careers that involve working with East Asian affairs and people or for graduate studies in aspects of East Asian language, economy and culture. Some career choices of recent graduates include journalism, international business, government service, teaching and social services.

Fluency in Chinese or Japanese is an integral part of the major requirement and at least one quarter of study abroad is strongly encouraged for majors to help ensure that they understand a language and culture other than their own.

Requirements

  • WORKSHEET -- click here for file
  • Preparatory Subject Matter 41-42 units
  • Depth Subject Matter 36 units
  • At least 12 additional upper division Elective units
  • Accepted Major languages: Chinese and Japanese only
  • TOTAL UNITS for Major = 77-78

Click here to access the UC Davis course catalog

Note to double majors: At least one, possibly two courses can overlap between majors.

New courses are added periodically. Please check with the Advisor for updates.

“He who asks is a fool for five minutes, but he who does not ask remains a fool forever.” Chinese proverb

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Minor

The goal of the minor in East Asian Studies is to provide the student with a broad background in East Asian culture as a whole while allowing the student to focus on a geographical or temporal aspect of East Asia. A language component has been omitted on purpose. While the acquisition of an Asian language is, of course, important to the understanding of a culture, other avenues are available for a student to combine language study with area study.

Courses taken for the minor are expected to reflect a predominant interest in either China or Japan, but also to provide some exposure to the other of the two countries. All courses counting towards the East Asian Studies major, including individual and group study courses (198, 199), may be used to fulfill the requirements for the minor program, as long as they deal predominantly with China, Japan, or both.

Requirements

  • WORKSHEET -- .pdf file
  • Two Tracks - China or Japan
    • China track -History 9B and 18 upper division units, of which at least 12 must be in courses focusing on China
    • Japan track - History 9A and 18 upper division units, of which at least 12 must be in courses focusing on Japan.
  • TOTAL UNITS needed for MINOR = 22
  • Only one course can overlap between major and minor.

Click here to access the UC Davis course catalog

New courses are added periodically. Please check with the advisor for updates.

“Those who know, do not speak. Those who speak, do not know.” Lao Tzu

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Fellowships

East Asian Studies Fellowship Award
Faculty members may choose a student to assist them with their research. Each year, the department has several fellowships to give out. There is no deadline. The research should enhance the student’s undergraduate education. Proposals must be typed and authored by the faculty sponsor. A grade point average of 3.5 and above is required to apply for the fellowship. Please download application (either as a Word Form, or PDF). For any other information or question please contact Cynthia VanSchaemelhout .

New M.A. program in Comparative and Public History at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. The one-year program offers a curriculum entirely in English on a range of topics (the poster mentions Japanese Nationalism, History and Ethnicity: Hong Kong and Taiwan; Sin-U.S. Relations; Sino-Foreign Relations in the Last Two Hundred Years, etc. www.cuhk.edu.hk/his/ma

The Japan-US Friendship Commission For details, please consult Fellowship Program for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan on the JUSFC homepage.

PKU-HY Graduate Fellowship Grant
The Harvard-Yenching Institute and the School for Overseas Education of Peking University are pleased to offer fellowships for U.S. students wishing to conduct advanced study or research in Chinese studies in China.
http://www.harvard-yenching.org/
The deadline for applications is February 1.

Freeman Asia
This award, administered by the Institute of International Education in conjunction with the Freeman Foundation, aims to promote undergraduate study in East and Southeast Asia. Awards are $3,000 to $7,000, depending on the length of the program. Priority is given
to students with no previous experience in their country of destination.
Information/Application:
Institute of International Education
809 United Nations Plaza
New York, NY 10017-3580
(212) 984-5487
Freeman-ASIA@iie.org
http://www.iie.org/pgms/Freeman-ASIA

Luce Scholars Program
This program provides fellowships for work in an Asian country. Its purpose is less academic than it is to expose young scholars to Asia. Consequently, it is offered only to college graduates who would not normally come in contact with Asia in the course of their careers. Fellowships run from late August to mid-July of the following year.

Applicants must be of US citizenship, hold at least a bachelor’s degree, and be no more than 29 years old at the beginning of the program. Nominations must be made by early December, and
interviews are held in late December or early January.

Information/Application:
The Henry Luce Foundation, Inc.
111 West Fiftieth Street
New York, NY 10020
(212) 480-7700
http://www.hluce.org/3scholfm.html

NSEP Boren Scholarship
Boren Scholarships provide up to $20,000 to U.S. undergraduate students to study abroad in areas of the world that are critical to U.S. interests and underrepresented in study abroad, including Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin American, and the Middle East.

Boren Scholars study less commonly taught languages, including but not limited to Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Swahili.

Boren Scholarships are funded by the National Security Education Program (NSEP), which focuses on geographic areas, languages, and fields of study deemed critical to U.S. national security. Applicants should identify how their study abroad program, as well as their future academic and career goals, will contribute to U.S. national security, broadly defined.  NSEP draws on a broad definition of national security, recognizing that the scope of national security has expanded to include not only the traditional concerns of protecting and promoting American well-being, but also the challenges of global society, including sustainable development, environmental degradation, global disease and hunger, population growth and migration, and economic competitiveness.

Boren Scholarships and Fellowships
Institute of International Education
1400 K Street, NW, 6th Floor
Washington, DC 20005-2403
1-800-618-NSEP
http://www.borenawards.org/boren_scholarship

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Non-Impacted Major

East Asian Studies is a NON-impacted major!

What is an impacted major?

Majors are officially declared as "impacted" by the campus administration, meaning that the department has insufficient resources to accommodate all students who wish to be majors of that particular department.

Accordingly, students who specify these impacted majors when they apply to UC Davis must meet certain course requirements before they can be "officially" admitted into the program. Similarly, petitions for on-campus changes of major into impacted majors are also subject to more stringent criteria than those typical for non-impacted programs.

Impacted majors @ ucd

  • International Relations
  • Communication
  • Engineering
  • Computer Science
  • Psychology
  • Managerial Economics

Why do I care about this?

It's harder to get into classes for these majors. Many impacted courses reach their enrollment max by the end of Pass I. When waitlists kick in during Pass II, there are still many more students in the impacted major and students in other majors waiting to enroll.

Since EAS is not impacted, it is easier to get into the needed courses and complete your major in a timely fashion. Since most careers require an advanced degree, you can potentially be done with your undergraduate degree and working on your graduate degree sooner by chosing a non-impacted major such as East Asian Studies.

“Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.” Chinese proverb

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Study Abroad

One program of interest to East Asian Studies majors is the education abroad program, which gives students the opportunity to live and experience the culture of their focus country. At UC Davis, the Internship and Career Center helps students obtain legislative, legal, and business internships. Additionally, the UC Davis Washington Center arranges internships and runs a full-credit academic program in Washington D.C. with a full range of opportunities for East Asian Studies majors. East Asian Studies graduates are prepared for employment in government agencies (such as Foreign Service), state agencies, international or non-governmental (such as United Nations), foundations, journalism, teaching, counseling and companies having an interest in international business, trade, finance. The stringent language requirement of the major program enhances career prospects in jobs that demand knowledge of language and culture of the focus country.

Both majors and non-majors who have acquired some knowledge of the Chinese or Japanese language may be particularly interested in the Education Abroad Program. The EAP offers undergraduates the opportunity to obtain U.C. credit for varying periods of study in universities in Singapore, Taipei and Seoul, as well as in several cities in Japan and China. The Japanese language program also administers six-week internships in children's homes throughout Japan.

UC Davis Summer Sessions Abroad programs consist of UC Davis classes taught by UC Davis professors in various locations around the world. The classes are structured in such a way that students gain knowledge not only in the classroom, but from experimental learning that takes advatage of the program site.

Internships enable the student to assess work skills, become familiar with possible future occupations or professions, and gain practical experience toward finding a job after graduation.

New Program: UC-Peking University Joint Center for International Studies (JCIS) program for fall semester 2005.

Where to look

  • Education Abroad Center
  • Summer Sessions Abroad Program
  • JET Programme
  • Freeman Asia
  • Abroad China
  • UC Davis Washington D.C. Center
  • Check out the internet for more possibilities!



“Study on EAP provides new academic insights, a broader understanding of other cultures, and the preparation to excel in the internationally competitive world.” UC EAP Program


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East Asian Studies vs. International Relations, Japanese, and Chinese

This page illustrates the main differences between the EAS major and IR, JPN, and CHN majors.

East Asian Studies vs. International Relations

Since international relations is one of the UC Davis' most competitive majors, you must fulfill basic requirements in economics, geography, history, and introductory international relations to be eligible for the program. The undergraduate major in International Relations is an interdisciplinary program focusing on economic, security, environmental, and socio-cultural issues affecting the global community. Four trakcs of study build a level of expertise in each of these areas.

East Asian Studies is a newer major in which you'll gain an understanding of this fascinating region through interdisciplinary studies that combine intensive work in an East Asian language with courses on history, politics and culture of east Asian countries. The East Asian studies program provides an excellent way to integrate language study of an East Asian country with other aspects of the country--hisotry, literature, anthropology, and so on--allowing the student to focus on his or her particular interests.

The difference? International Relations has been around longer and is more well known. It will provide the student with a general international studies background, however if you want to focus exclusively on East Asia, EAS provides a complete educational background for many international careers.



East Asian Studies vs. Japanese or Chinese

The majors in Japanese and Chinese concentrate on the study of language and literature. As a Japanese/Chinese major, you will first build a strong foundation in either language, then cultivate an understanding of the literature and civilization. You will gain perspective and context about Japanese/Chinese culture from classes in history and anthropology.

With East Asian Studies, you may choose to focus on Chinese or Japanese language and culture, although you will be encouraged to study aspects of the culture of each country. You will begin with core courses in East Asian history, humanities, social sciences, and languages. After completing these courses and two years or more of your chosen language, you will choose additional courses focusing on a special field of interest such as anthropology or history.

The difference? Japanese and Chinese focus more on the language and literature, whereas EAS has a broader focus which will provide a background suitable for many fields, incorporating courses from political science, economics, history, sociology, and anthropology.

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All Events

Hannah Sigur Talk on Japan Oct 07, 2008 from 04:10 PM to 06:00 PM 210D Art,
Toshiro Matsumoto Talk on Japan Jan 23, 2008 from 04:30 PM to 06:00 PM 912 Sproul HallToshiro Matsumoto, Okayama University, Japan,
A talk on Chinese, East Asian Studies, and Japanese Majors Feb 27, 2008 from 12:00 PM to 02:00 PM 53A Olson Hall,
A talk on Chinese, East Asian Studies, and Japanese Majors
Zhang Yunchang talk on China. Feb 29, 2008 from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM ARC. Ballrooms A & B,
Shengli Feng Talk on Chinese Teaching and Research. Mar 11, 2008 from 05:00 PM to 06:00 PM 5 pm, 53A Olson,
A Chinese Art Exhibition from Apr 03, 2008 06:00 PM to May 18, 2008 08:00 PM Nelson Gallery, Art Building,
The Global Circulation of Ang Lee's Lust Apr 08, 2008 12:00 AM Time and Location TBA ,
Regina Llamas talk on Career Development Apr 09, 2008 from 04:10 PM to 06:00 PM 53A Olson,
The Romance of the Opium War Apr 21, 2008 from 02:00 PM to 03:30 PM 53A Olson,
Mariko Talk on Anthro and Japan May 12, 2008 from 04:00 PM to 06:00 PM 104 Sproul Hall,
Seminar on Chinese Grammar and Pedagogy of Advanced Chinese Apr 23, 2014 from 03:10 PM to 06:00 PM 18A Olson Hall,
EAS, EACL and Confucius Institute are co-sponsoring this event.
Image JPEG imageEASScholars2014Flyer.jpg
Event Flyer
Image JPEG image2014ChinesePedagogySeminarFlyerb.jpg

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Study Abroad

The experience of living abroad for an extended period is life changing. At the same time that living abroad helps students discover new things, it helps them redefine their own sense of identity and personal values. Faculty in the Program for East Asian Studies strongly encourage students to take advantage of study abroad opportunities. Studying abroad allows students to apply, experiment, and refine their classroom knowledge through interactions with peers, teachers, and people in the host-country. It enables a kind of cultural immediacy and intellectual relevancy available only outside one's own national comfort zone. As well, it can foster life-long friendships and connections.

Study Abroad - Read More…

Internships

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Research

Research Forum

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Graduate Programs

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Work Opportunities

Opportunities offered to undergraduates and recent graduates to work in fields pertaining to East Asian Studies
Teaching English Abroad
WindowJob and Internship Opportunities

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Make a Gift

Make a Gift

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Courses

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Gundry Talk

Gundry Talk
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The Art of Tea

The Art of Tea
The Art of Tea
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The Art of Tea pic

The Art of Tea pic
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Archive

Archive of past events, news items, etc.

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Andy Walder talk

Andy Walder talk
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Andrew Walder Talk

Andrew Walder, Stanford University, will present a talk on Rebellion and Repression in China, 1966-1971
When Jan 21, 2014
from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM
Where SSH 2203
Contact Name
Contact Phone 530-752-3046
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Andy Walder talk

In the first five years after the onset of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, one of the largest political upheavals of the 20th

century paralyzed a powerfully centralized party state, leading to a harsh regime of military control. Despite a wave of

post-Mao revelations in the 1980s, knowledge about the nationwide

impact of this insurgency and its suppression remains

selective and impressionistic, based primarily on scattered

local accounts. A dataset drawn from historical narratives

published in 2,213 county and city annals (99 percent of

all local jurisdictions), permits us to map the temporal and

geographic spread of a mass insurgency, its evolution through

time, and the repression through which militarized state structures

were rebuilt. Statistical models designed to compensate

for sample selection bias yield estimates for deaths and political

casualties from various causes. The vast majority of casualties

were due to organized repression by authorities, not the

actions of insurgents in the course of rebellion. Despite the

large aggregate death toll, on a per capita basis the Cultural Revolution was considerably less intense than other wellknown

cases of politically-induced mortality.

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Frederik Schodt talk

Frederik L. Schodt, Award-winning Author, will present: Professor Risley and the Imperial Japanese Troupe
Frederik Schodt talk
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Frederik Schodt talk

Frederik Schodt, award-winning author, will present a talk on "Professor Risley and the Imperial Troupe: How an American acrobat introduced circus to Japan - and Japan to the West.
When Jan 23, 2014
from 05:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Where Cruess Hall 220
Contact Name
Contact Phone 530-752-3046
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Frederik Schodt talk

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The Art of Tea

When Nov 21, 2013 03:00 PM to
Nov 22, 2013 06:00 PM
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Contact Phone 530-752-3046
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THE ART OF TEA

 

 You are warmly invited to attend the following events on campus focusing on tea, the second most consumed beverage in the world. They include a tea tasting/demonstration (Nov. 21), a colloquium on Chinese tea and history of tea and tea utensils in East Asia (Nov. 22), and two exhibitions of tea-related materials across the UC Davis campus. All are free and open to the public.

 

 

Nov. 21          Tea Tasting Demonstration with Tea Master Wingchi Ip

3:10- 5:00 PM, Sensory Theater, Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science.  Reception to follow.

This demonstration of tea brewing and tasting, is led by Tea Master Wingchi Ip. The audience will be invited to view and ask questions as students from UC Davis’s first seminar tea, The Impact of Tea on Visual and Material Culture, learn about tea tasting and sensory issues.

 

Nov. 22          Colloquium on The Art of Tea

3:00- 5:00 PM           Nelson Gallery 

This colloquium features two talks: one by a tea master, the other by a tea scholar. Both will be enlightening.

 

Wingchi Ip, The Way(s) of Drinking Tea

This talk will explain how to select, brew, and taste teas, as well as throw light on the differences between the primary types of Chinese teas on the market: green, greenish, red, white, yellow and black.

Wingchi Ip is a Tea Master, tea scholar, artist, Director of Lock Cha Tea Shop, and a tea exporter and retailer from Hong Kong. He is serving or has served as Visiting Professor, Shu Ren University, Hangzhou; Visiting Lecturer, Wuyi University, Fujian; Visiting Artist, Chinese University of Hong Kong; and Director of China Tea Association.

 

Dr. Steven D. Owyoung, Drinking from the Dragon’s Well: An Introduction to the Tea Cultures of China, Korea, and Japan

In this talk, Dr. Owyoung presents the historical figures and events that inspired the evolution of tea from a tonic and beverage into a philosophical and spiritual pursuit.  He reveals the influence of continental China – the major movements in tea – on peninsular Korea and the islands of Japan, highlighting the distinctive practices developed by each civilization.  His richly illustrated lecture closely examines the aesthetic of tea and its impact on literary, monastic, and material culture from poetry and meditation to utensils and architecture.

Dr. Owyoung was a curator of Asian arts at the Fogg Art Museum and the Saint Louis Art Museum during a scholarly career spanning thirty-five years.  Now retired, he writes on the history of tea – East and West – and is completing an introduction and translation of the Chajing 茶經, the Book of Tea by the Tang dynasty scholar Lu Yü.  Owyoung periodically publishes essays on the websites Cha Dao and Tsiosophy.

 

Exhibitions

Nov. 21 - Dec. 15    WIngchi Ip & the Art of Tea, Nelson Gallery, UC Davis

From the perspective of a Tea Master, this talk will explain how to select, brew, and taste teas, as well as throw light on the differences between the primary types of Chinese teas on the market: green, greenish, red, white, yellow and black.

Wingchi Ip is a Tea Master, tea scholar, artist, Director of Lock Cha Tea Shop, as well as a tea exporter and retailer from Hong Kong. He is serving or has served as Visiting Professor, Shu Ren University, Hangzhou; Visiting Lecturer, Wuyi University, Fujian; Visiting Artist, Chinese University of Hong Kong; and Director of China Tea Association.

 

Nov. 21 – Mar. 2014    Tea related materials from Special Collections, Shields Library

This exhibition includes a selection of rare and important books and illustrated materials from the A.W. Noling Hurty-Peck Collection of Beverage Literature in UC Davis’s Special Collections. 

 

Please mark your calendars and be sure to join us!

Click here for flier.

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Shinya Maezaki flier

Shinya Maezaki flier
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Shinya Maezaki talk

Shinya Maezaki of Ristumeikan University, Kyoto, Japan, will present a talk on "San Francisco between 1858 and 1912: Gate fo Japanese Ceramics to the United States."
When Oct 08, 2013
from 04:10 PM to 05:30 PM
Where Everson 157
Contact Name Katharine Burnett
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More information about this event…

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Patrick Kinkade pic

Patrick Kinkade pic
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Wingchi Ip with student

Wingchi Ip with student
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EAS Tea event was a BIG SUCCESS!!!

With 100s in attendance and coverage by local media, our Art of TEA event last November was a huge success! Look for more soon...

 

 

For more information on the event, visit the California Aggie article at

http://www.theaggie.org/2013/11/21/the-nelson-gallery-presents-the-art-of-tea/

 

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Wingchi Tasting_panaramic

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EAS Banner_Wingchi

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New Year Celebration 2014

New Year Celebration 2014
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Annual Chinese Lunar New Year Celebration

INVITE ONLY! If you did not receive an email invitation regarding this event, please contact pkkinkade@ucdavis.edu for information.
When Feb 06, 2014
from 07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Contact Name
Contact Phone 530-752-3046
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The Program in
East Asian Studies
in collaboration with the
Confucius Institute at UC Davis
is hosting our
Annual Chinese Lunar
New Year Celebration

 

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EAS Fred Schodt talk makes DHI news!

East Asian Studies guest speaker, Frederik Schodt, delivers fascinating talk!

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Student Meet & Greet

Come meet the students of Economics, History & East Asian Studies for a Student Panel as part of UC Davis Decision Day
When Apr 05, 2014
from 02:30 PM to 03:30 PM
Where 2203 Social Science & Humanities
Contact Name
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Christopher Tong receives Postdoctoral Researcher position at Washington University!

Congratulations to EAS friend and doctoral student of Comparative Literature, Christopher Tong, who has received a Postdoctoral Researcher position in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Washington University in St. Louis. We are so proud!

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EAS Visiting Scholars talk on Chinese Film Studies

Our current visiting scholars who are working on Chinese film studies will present their work during this noontime event. Everyone is welcome!
When May 01, 2014
from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM
Where 273 Social Science & Humanities Building
Contact Name
Contact Phone 530-601-0434
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CLICK HERE for flyer.

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KOREAN PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE Gamin Hyosung Kang, P'IRI

Gamin Hyosung Kang will join the UC Davis Korean Percussion Ensemble which is led by director Katherine In-Young Lee. Currently in residence in New York on an Asian Cultural Council grant, Gamin Hyosung Kang is a classically trained p’iri (double reed instrument) player who has performed extensively in South Korea as a member of the National Gugak Center’s contemporary Korean music orchestra. She has recently collaborated with many Western classical, jazz, and experimental musicians in both Korea and the United States.
When May 29, 2014
from 12:05 PM to 01:00 PM
Where Main Theatre, Wright Hall
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More information about this event…

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What Makes Chines Food So Delicious?

hosted by the Confucius Institute at UC Davis.
When May 20, 2014
from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM
Where Student Community Center
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What Makes Chinese Food So Delicious?
Tuesday, May 20, 2014
12-1pm
Student Community Center, Meeting Room D

Register here: http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=x74p6bpab&oeidk=a07e93m125wb899fb3c 

What makes Chinese food so delicious? What does recipe mean to Chinese people? Starting from the classification of Chinese cuisines, this presentation means to reveal the secret of yummy Chinese dishes: the perfect blend of five flavors. What’s more, we’ll see that the five flavors are actually closely connected with the health of different organs of human beings.

 

http://confucius.ucdavis.edu/programsevents/lectures.html

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Safe Travel Abroad Workshop

Thinking about going abroad? Want to hear from a U.S. Ambassador on the subject? The Internship and Career Center (ICC) is hosting this very informative workshop.
When May 20, 2014
from 12:10 PM to 01:00 PM
Where South Hall, Room 114
Contact Name Caitlin Ashby
Contact Phone 752-2819
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Safe Travel Abroad Workshop
Tuesday, May 20th
12:10 pm – 1:00 pm
South Hall, Room 114
 
Thinking about going abroad?  Are you or your loved ones worried about your health and safety?  Be proactive, come to this ICC-sponsored workshop!  The best way to ease worries and prepare for a healthy and safe international experience is to be informed before leaving the US. Loved ones are welcome to attend the workshop.
 
Speakers will provide up-to-date relevant information and practical advice that you can easily put to use!  Speakers will include:
·         Ambassador Steve Browning – State Department Diplomat in Residence, US Department of State
·         Dr. Thomas Ferguson – UC Davis Student Health and Counseling services
 
Information on health and safety at every stage of your overseas experience will be discussed, including special considerations as an American traveling abroad, immunizations, packing tips, disease treatment and prevention, staying abreast of world events, safe food and drinking water, emergencies, and much more!
 
All majors and class levels welcome!
 
 
Caitlin Ashby
Program Assistant
UC Davis Internship & Career Center
One Shields Ave.
Davis, CA 95616
(530) 752-2819
http://icc.ucdavis.edu

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Summer Course Offering: AHI 163C - Painting in the People's Republic of China in Summer Session 1

Join our Director, Katharine Burnett, as she offers this excellent class this summer!

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EAS End-of-Year Reception

Join the East Asian Studies program faculty, staff, and students as we celebrate a great year for our program, and for many of our program participants!
When May 21, 2014
from 04:00 PM to 05:30 PM
Where 2203 Social Science & Humanities
Contact Name
Contact Phone 530-752-3046
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If you did not receive an invitation but would like to attend, please email Patrick - pkkinkade@ucdavis.edu.

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Chinese Culture Day

Join student clubs and other participants to celebrate Chinese Culture!
When May 27, 2014
from 03:30 PM to 05:30 PM
Where Student Community Center, Multipurpose Room
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Fall 2014 EAS Courses

See below for our 2014 Fall course list.

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2014 Spring Quarter STUDY HALL

Join us for a quiet, cool place to study. We will have our conference room stocked with refreshments during finals week beginning FRIDAY!
When Jun 06, 2014 01:00 PM to
Jun 12, 2014 12:00 PM
Where 1271 Social Science & Humanities Building
Contact Name
Contact Phone 530-601-0434
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East Asian Studies

1277 Social Sciences and Humanities Bldg. 
University of California, Davis 
One Shields Avenue 
Davis, CA 95616 

(530) 752-3046 phone
(530) 752-5655 fax